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Wanderlust

I am a 22 year old space and science enthusiast. Terrestrial tectonics, exoplanets, stars, interstellar voids, spacecraft, you name it. I love it.

Posts tagged astronomy

Jan 5 '13
Groombridge 1618
The star Groombridge 1618 is an orange dwarf star of the spectral type K5V. The star is estimated to be a billion years old and is located 16 light-years from Sol. Groombridge 1618 is smaller and dimmer than the sun being only 60% as massive and currently 13% as luminous. The habitable zone of this star is estimated to be between 0.3 AU to 0.6 astronomical units. A yet unconfirmed planet is believed to be orbiting in the middle of this zone at 0.4 AU. However, the planet is estimated to be around 4 Jupiter masses. The remaining lifetime of this star is 40 billion years.
Just to clarify, 40 billion years. That is 4 times as old as Earth will ever be. This star still will continue shining happily 35 billion years after Earth is reduced to nothing. I love it, this humble little star shows us how deep the chasm of time really is and how small we fit into it. But take comfort in the knowledge that we do fit. It may be a little fit, but its enough to catch a glimpse of what truly was, is and may be.

Groombridge 1618

The star Groombridge 1618 is an orange dwarf star of the spectral type K5V. The star is estimated to be a billion years old and is located 16 light-years from Sol. Groombridge 1618 is smaller and dimmer than the sun being only 60% as massive and currently 13% as luminous. The habitable zone of this star is estimated to be between 0.3 AU to 0.6 astronomical units. A yet unconfirmed planet is believed to be orbiting in the middle of this zone at 0.4 AU. However, the planet is estimated to be around 4 Jupiter masses. The remaining lifetime of this star is 40 billion years.

Just to clarify, 40 billion years. That is 4 times as old as Earth will ever be. This star still will continue shining happily 35 billion years after Earth is reduced to nothing. I love it, this humble little star shows us how deep the chasm of time really is and how small we fit into it. But take comfort in the knowledge that we do fit. It may be a little fit, but its enough to catch a glimpse of what truly was, is and may be.

Dec 24 '12

There is no greater insult to the stars than astrology.

Dec 23 '12

Upsilon Andromadae 

Constellation: Andromeda

Distance: 44.25 Lightyears

Absolute Magnitude: 3.44 VS 4.83 Sol

Apparent Magnitude: 4.09 VS -26 Sol

Spectral Class: F8V

Mass: 127% VS 100% Sol 

Radius: 140% Sol VS 100% Sol

Luminosity: 52% Sol

Habitable Zone: Inner 0.52AU to Center 0.74 AU to Outer 1.15 AU

Temperature: 6,074 K vs 5,778 Sol

Rotation: 7 Days VS 25 Sol

Radial Velocity: -28 km/s, approaching earth

Galactic Eccentricity: 20.6% VS 16.0% for Sol

Closest Approach: Upsilon Andromedae will make its closest approach to the sun in 245,000 years at 30 light-years.

Age: 2.6 billion years VS Sol’s 4.5 Gy

Projected Lifespan: 6.5 billion years, 40% of lifetime used VS 45% for sun

Known Planets:

Upsilon Andromedae b:

Distance: 0.05 AU

Mass: 0.62 Jupiter

Orbital Period: 4.6 days 

Upsilon Andromedae c:

Distance: 0.83 AU

Mass: 1.8 Jupiters

Orbital Period: 241 days

Upsilon Andromedae d:

Distance: 2.53 AU

Mass: 3.75 Jupiters

Orbital Period: 1276 Days

Upsilon Andromedae e:

Distance: 5.24 AU

Mass: 0.96 Jupiters

Orbital Period: 3848 Days

Dec 20 '12
The Tau Ceti System

The Tau Ceti System

Nov 10 '12
The recently revised planetary system of HD 40307 used to only be 6 lightyears away from our solar system 413,000 years ago, one of our nearest stars. The individual movements of stars in their orbit around our galaxy cause each star to drift toward and away from each other. Their set of neighbors is in constant change. So, the closest star system to us Alpha Centauri, is only so for a relativity brief amount of time. A hundred million years from now it may be on the other side of the galaxy. 

The recently revised planetary system of HD 40307 used to only be 6 lightyears away from our solar system 413,000 years ago, one of our nearest stars. The individual movements of stars in their orbit around our galaxy cause each star to drift toward and away from each other. Their set of neighbors is in constant change. So, the closest star system to us Alpha Centauri, is only so for a relativity brief amount of time. A hundred million years from now it may be on the other side of the galaxy. 

Nov 1 '12
This is what Venus would really look like without clouds!

This is what Venus would really look like without clouds!

Oct 15 '12
Clouds on Mars

Clouds on Mars

Oct 13 '12
The Star Epsilon Indi is located 11.83 lightyears from Earth. This star is only 60% the mass of the sun and is 1.3 billion years old. The estimated lifespan of this star is 27 billion years, which means it is only 4% through its main sequence stage. This star will continue to live in the main sequence for 22 billion years after our sun has destroyed our planet and faded into a white dwarf. The ideal habitable zone for this star is 0.46 AU, which is just beyond the orbit of Mercury in our system. Any worlds located here are in it for the long haul.

Fun Fact: Epsilon Indi weighs 701 Jupiters

The Star Epsilon Indi is located 11.83 lightyears from Earth. This star is only 60% the mass of the sun and is 1.3 billion years old. The estimated lifespan of this star is 27 billion years, which means it is only 4% through its main sequence stage. This star will continue to live in the main sequence for 22 billion years after our sun has destroyed our planet and faded into a white dwarf. The ideal habitable zone for this star is 0.46 AU, which is just beyond the orbit of Mercury in our system. Any worlds located here are in it for the long haul.

Fun Fact: Epsilon Indi weighs 701 Jupiters

Jun 20 '12
The B612 foundation is going to announce the first privately funded deep space mission to look out for dangerous asteroids.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2012/06/19/b612-foundation-to-announce-first-privately-funded-deep-space-mission/
Who: The B612 Foundation
What: Press Conference to Launch the B612 Foundation and Sentinel Space Telescope Mission-the first privately funded deep space mission.
When: Thursday, June 28, 2012 — 8:30 AM – 11:00 AM (PT)
Where: Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences, 55 Music Concourse Drive, San Francisco, CA, in Golden Gate Park. (Pay Parking in CA Academy Garage)
Announcement: On June 28, 2012, the B612 Foundation will announce its plans to build, operate and launch the world’s first privately funded deep space mission–a space telescope to be placed in orbit around the Sun. We will create the first comprehensive dynamic map of our inner solar system showing the current and future locations and trajectories of Earth-crossing asteroids, paving the way to protect the Earth from future impacts and opening up the Solar System to future exploration.
Speakers at the June 28 Press Conference:
Ed Lu, Chairman & CEO,former Space Shuttle/ISS/Soyuz Astronaut
Rusty Schweickart, Chairman Emeritus,Lunar Module Pilot, Apollo 9
Scott Hubbard, Project Architect,Stanford University, former Dir., NASA Ames
Harold Reitsema, Mission Director,former Dir. Science Mission Dev., Ball Aerospace
The B612 Foundation (www.b612foundation.org) aims to build, launch, and operate the world’s first privately funded deep space telescope mission to create the first comprehensive dynamic map of our inner solar system, identifying the current and future locations and trajectories of Earth crossing asteroids. Mapping the great unknown of the inner solar system is the first step to opening up this next frontier. The B612 Foundation believes that humanity can harness the power of science and technology to protect the future of civilization on this planet, while extending our reach into the solar system.

The B612 foundation is going to announce the first privately funded deep space mission to look out for dangerous asteroids.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2012/06/19/b612-foundation-to-announce-first-privately-funded-deep-space-mission/

Who: The B612 Foundation

What: Press Conference to Launch the B612 Foundation and Sentinel Space Telescope Mission-the first privately funded deep space mission.

When: Thursday, June 28, 2012 — 8:30 AM – 11:00 AM (PT)

Where: Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences, 55 Music Concourse Drive, San Francisco, CA, in Golden Gate Park. (Pay Parking in CA Academy Garage)

Announcement: On June 28, 2012, the B612 Foundation will announce its plans to build, operate and launch the world’s first privately funded deep space mission–a space telescope to be placed in orbit around the Sun. We will create the first comprehensive dynamic map of our inner solar system showing the current and future locations and trajectories of Earth-crossing asteroids, paving the way to protect the Earth from future impacts and opening up the Solar System to future exploration.

Speakers at the June 28 Press Conference:

  • Ed Lu, Chairman & CEO,former Space Shuttle/ISS/Soyuz Astronaut
  • Rusty Schweickart, Chairman Emeritus,Lunar Module Pilot, Apollo 9
  • Scott Hubbard, Project Architect,Stanford University, former Dir., NASA Ames
  • Harold Reitsema, Mission Director,former Dir. Science Mission Dev., Ball Aerospace

The B612 Foundation (www.b612foundation.org) aims to build, launch, and operate the world’s first privately funded deep space telescope mission to create the first comprehensive dynamic map of our inner solar system, identifying the current and future locations and trajectories of Earth crossing asteroids. Mapping the great unknown of the inner solar system is the first step to opening up this next frontier. The B612 Foundation believes that humanity can harness the power of science and technology to protect the future of civilization on this planet, while extending our reach into the solar system.

Dec 23 '11
Comet Lovejoy

Comet Lovejoy