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Wanderlust

I am a 24 year old space and science enthusiast. Terrestrial tectonics, exoplanets, stars, interstellar voids, spacecraft, you name it. I love it.

Posts tagged Earth

Nov 9 '12
Started Reading this book. The greatest story on Earth, is the story of Earth.

Started Reading this book. The greatest story on Earth, is the story of Earth.

Dec 21 '11
Axial precession is the movement of the rotational axis of an astronomical body, whereby the axis slowly traces out a cone. In the case of Earth, this type of precession is also known as the precession of the equinoxes or precession of the equator. Earth goes through one such complete precessional cycle in a period of approximately 26,000 years. Over this cycle, Earth’s north axial pole moves from where it is now, within 1° of Polaris, in a circle around the ecliptic pole, with an angular radius of about 23.5 degrees.  Thus, while today the star Polaris lies approximately at the north celestial pole, this will change over time, and other stars will become the “north star”. The south celestial pole currently lacks a bright star to mark its position, but over time precession will also cause bright stars to become south stars. As the celestial poles shift, there is a corresponding gradual shift in the apparent orientation of the whole star field, as viewed from a particular position on Earth.
The angle between Earth’s rotational axis and the normal to the plane of its orbit (obliquity) oscillates between 22.1 and 24.5 degrees on a 41,000-year cycle. It is currently 23.44 degrees and decreasing.

Axial precession is the movement of the rotational axis of an astronomical body, whereby the axis slowly traces out a cone. In the case of Earth, this type of precession is also known as the precession of the equinoxes or precession of the equator. Earth goes through one such complete precessional cycle in a period of approximately 26,000 years. Over this cycle, Earth’s north axial pole moves from where it is now, within 1° of Polaris, in a circle around the ecliptic pole, with an angular radius of about 23.5 degrees.  Thus, while today the star Polaris lies approximately at the north celestial pole, this will change over time, and other stars will become the “north star”. The south celestial pole currently lacks a bright star to mark its position, but over time precession will also cause bright stars to become south stars. As the celestial poles shift, there is a corresponding gradual shift in the apparent orientation of the whole star field, as viewed from a particular position on Earth.

The angle between Earth’s rotational axis and the normal to the plane of its orbit (obliquity) oscillates between 22.1 and 24.5 degrees on a 41,000-year cycle. It is currently 23.44 degrees and decreasing.

Sep 24 '11
absolute-best-posts:

Time lapse of the ISS orbiting the Earth.
[HQ GIF] [video]
From thefrogman, follow thefrogman for more posts like this
Click to follow this blog, you will be so glad you did!

absolute-best-posts:

Time lapse of the ISS orbiting the Earth.

[HQ GIF] [video]

From thefrogman, follow thefrogman for more posts like this

Click to follow this blog, you will be so glad you did!

Sep 3 '11
Aug 31 '11
philosophicalpuppy:

Orbit buddy

Gaww lol

philosophicalpuppy:

Orbit buddy

Gaww lol

Aug 30 '11
itsfullofstars:

This image of Earth (on the left) and the moon (on the right) was taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on Aug. 26, 2011, when the spacecraft was about 6 million miles (9.66 million kilometers) away. It was taken by the spacecraft’s onboard camera, JunoCam. The solar-powered Juno spacecraft lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Aug. 5 to begin a five-year journey to Jupiter.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech 

itsfullofstars:

This image of Earth (on the left) and the moon (on the right) was taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on Aug. 26, 2011, when the spacecraft was about 6 million miles (9.66 million kilometers) away. It was taken by the spacecraft’s onboard camera, JunoCam. The solar-powered Juno spacecraft lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Aug. 5 to begin a five-year journey to Jupiter.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech 

Aug 28 '11
Aug 28 '11
astrotastic:

This man.

K, ill go Earth. cya laterz

astrotastic:

This man.

K, ill go Earth. cya laterz

Aug 21 '11

The planets via Hubble/APOD