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Wanderlust

I am a 22 year old space and science enthusiast. Terrestrial tectonics, exoplanets, stars, interstellar voids, spacecraft, you name it. I love it.
Apr 5 '14

(Source: kateoplis)

Apr 5 '14
distant-traveller:


Red dwarf planet







The artist’s conception shows a hypothetical planet with two moons orbiting in the habitable zone of a red dwarf star. Using publicly available data from NASA’s Kepler space telescope, astronomers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) estimate that six percent of red dwarf stars have an Earth-sized planet in the “habitable zone,” the range of distances from a star where the surface temperature of an orbiting planet might be suitable for liquid water.The majority of the sun’s closest stellar neighbors are red dwarfs. Researchers now believe that an Earth-size planet with a moderate temperature may be just 13 light-years away.Astronomers don’t know if life could exist on a planet orbiting a red dwarf. However, this finding suggests that the most common type of the star in the galaxy may provide many more cosmic neighborhoods to search for planets that may be like our own.

Image credit: D. Aguilar/Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

distant-traveller:

Red dwarf planet

The artist’s conception shows a hypothetical planet with two moons orbiting in the habitable zone of a red dwarf star. Using publicly available data from NASA’s Kepler space telescope, astronomers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) estimate that six percent of red dwarf stars have an Earth-sized planet in the “habitable zone,” the range of distances from a star where the surface temperature of an orbiting planet might be suitable for liquid water.
The majority of the sun’s closest stellar neighbors are red dwarfs. Researchers now believe that an Earth-size planet with a moderate temperature may be just 13 light-years away.
Astronomers don’t know if life could exist on a planet orbiting a red dwarf. However, this finding suggests that the most common type of the star in the galaxy may provide many more cosmic neighborhoods to search for planets that may be like our own.

Image credit: D. Aguilar/Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

(Source: nasa.gov)

Apr 5 '14
vanessafire13:

The Southern Ring Nebula

vanessafire13:

The Southern Ring Nebula

Mar 30 '14
darnni:

i-dont-know-just-stop:

britishstarr:

farnaz:

Can we all appreciate my sisters kindergarten class’ responses to what they thought the sun was made out of

god and jesus


Foam and String

Noah thinks the sun is a government conspiracy

darnni:

i-dont-know-just-stop:

britishstarr:

farnaz:

Can we all appreciate my sisters kindergarten class’ responses to what they thought the sun was made out of

god and jesus

Foam and String

Noah thinks the sun is a government conspiracy

Mar 30 '14

lillianliveblogs:

At the center of a series of black holes is a parking lot.

-Things I learned on Cosmos today.

Mar 26 '14
sci-universe:

First Asteroid With Rings Discovered (like how cool is that?!)
Until now it seemed that only giant planets had the gravity to hold on to the billions of bits of orbiting ice and dust that make up a ring, but in a paper published today in Nature, astronomers report the discovery of two icy rings around a small object named Chariklo that orbits between Saturn and Uranus.
The discovery was made possible by observations at many sites in South America, including ESO's La Silla Observatory. The origin of these rings remains a mystery, but they may be the result of a collision that created a disc of debris.
"This probably will be the biggest discovery of my career," says Felipe Braga-Ribas of the National Observatory in Brazil, who led the team that found the rings, and who received his Ph.D. just last year.
Sources: 1, 2Illustration by Lucie Maquet

sci-universe:

First Asteroid With Rings Discovered (like how cool is that?!)

Until now it seemed that only giant planets had the gravity to hold on to the billions of bits of orbiting ice and dust that make up a ring, but in a paper published today in Nature, astronomers report the discovery of two icy rings around a small object named Chariklo that orbits between Saturn and Uranus.

The discovery was made possible by observations at many sites in South America, including ESO's La Silla Observatory. The origin of these rings remains a mystery, but they may be the result of a collision that created a disc of debris.

"This probably will be the biggest discovery of my career," says Felipe Braga-Ribas of the National Observatory in Brazil, who led the team that found the rings, and who received his Ph.D. just last year.

Sources: 1, 2
Illustration by Lucie Maquet

Mar 25 '14

Ort was also the first to correctly estimate the distance between the Sun from the center of our galaxy. That’s a big deal, finding out where we are in the Milky Way. 

I loved this bit about Oort.

Mar 23 '14

karzahnii:

a story about tumblr’s collective ability to fact check

Mar 23 '14
palaeopedia:

Near the horn beast, Paraceratherium (1911)or Indricotherium (Indric beast)/Baluchitherium (beast of Baluchistan)
Phylum : ChordataClass : MammaliaOrder : PerissodactylaFamily : HyracodontidaeSubfamily : IndricotherinaeGenus : ParaceratheriumSpecies : P. bugtiense, P. transouralicum, P. prohorovi, P. orgosensis, P. zhajremensis
Oligocene (38 - 20,4 Ma)
9,5 m long and 15 000 kg (size)
Pakistan, Mongolia and western China (map)

Ever since its scattered, oversized remains were discovered in the early 20th century, Indricotherium has occasioned controversy among paleontologists, who have named this giant mammal not once, but three times—Indricotherium, Paraceratherium and Baluchitherium have all been in common usage, with the first two currently battling it out for supremacy. (For the record, Paraceratherium seems to have won the race among paleontologists, but Indricotherium is still preferred by the general public—and may yet wind up being assigned to a separate, but similar, genus.)
Whatever you choose to call it, Indricotherium was, hands-down, the largest terrestrial mammal that ever lived, approaching the size of the giant sauropod dinosaurs that preceded it by over a hundred million years. An ancestor of the modern rhinoceros, the 15-to-20-ton Indricotherium had a relatively long neck (though nothing approaching what you’d see on a Diplodocus or Brachiosaurus) and surprisingly thin legs with three-toed feet, which years ago used to be portrayed as elephant-like stumps. The fossil evidence is lacking, but this huge herbivore probably possessed a prehensile upper lip—not quite a trunk, but an appendage flexible enough to allow it to grab and tear the tall leaves of trees.
To date, fossils of Indricotherium have only been found in the central and eastern parts of Eurasia, but it’s possible that this gigantic mammal also stomped across the plains of western Europe and (conceivably) other continents as well during the Oligocene epoch. Classified as a “hyrocodont” mammal, one of its closest relatives was the much smaller (only about 500 pound) Hyracodon, a distant North American anecstor of the modern rhinoceros.

palaeopedia:

Near the horn beast, Paraceratherium (1911)
or Indricotherium (Indric beast)/Baluchitherium (beast of Baluchistan)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Mammalia
Order : Perissodactyla
Family : Hyracodontidae
Subfamily : Indricotherinae
Genus : Paraceratherium
Species : P. bugtiense, P. transouralicum, P. prohorovi, P. orgosensis, P. zhajremensis

  • Oligocene (38 - 20,4 Ma)
  • 9,5 m long and 15 000 kg (size)
  • Pakistan, Mongolia and western China (map)

Ever since its scattered, oversized remains were discovered in the early 20th century, Indricotherium has occasioned controversy among paleontologists, who have named this giant mammal not once, but three times—Indricotherium, Paraceratherium and Baluchitherium have all been in common usage, with the first two currently battling it out for supremacy. (For the record, Paraceratherium seems to have won the race among paleontologists, but Indricotherium is still preferred by the general public—and may yet wind up being assigned to a separate, but similar, genus.)

Whatever you choose to call it, Indricotherium was, hands-down, the largest terrestrial mammal that ever lived, approaching the size of the giant sauropod dinosaurs that preceded it by over a hundred million years. An ancestor of the modern rhinoceros, the 15-to-20-ton Indricotherium had a relatively long neck (though nothing approaching what you’d see on a Diplodocus or Brachiosaurus) and surprisingly thin legs with three-toed feet, which years ago used to be portrayed as elephant-like stumps. The fossil evidence is lacking, but this huge herbivore probably possessed a prehensile upper lip—not quite a trunk, but an appendage flexible enough to allow it to grab and tear the tall leaves of trees.

To date, fossils of Indricotherium have only been found in the central and eastern parts of Eurasia, but it’s possible that this gigantic mammal also stomped across the plains of western Europe and (conceivably) other continents as well during the Oligocene epoch. Classified as a “hyrocodont” mammal, one of its closest relatives was the much smaller (only about 500 pound) Hyracodon, a distant North American anecstor of the modern rhinoceros.

Mar 22 '14
here is a picture of some ocean canyons and shelf. enjoy.

here is a picture of some ocean canyons and shelf. enjoy.